Peace Circle & Restorative Practices Training

The Circle Process.

The Circle Process provides a safe, structured environment to discuss difficult or painful issues. The process is based on an assumption of equal worth and dignity for all participants, and, therefore, provides equal voice to all participants.

The Circle Process is deliberate in outlining how the conversation will be held before discussing the difficult issues. Consequently, the Circle establishes values and guidelines before talking about the differences or conflict. Where possible, the Circle also works on relationship building before discussing the difficult issues.

Restorative Justice Conferencing

A restorative conference is a structured meeting between offenders, victims and both parties’ family and friends, in which they deal with the consequences of the crime or wrongdoing and decide how best to repair the harm. Neither a counseling nor a mediation process, conferencing is a victim-sensitive, straightforward problem-solving method that demonstrates how citizens can resolve their own problems when provided with a constructive forum to do so. Conferences provide victims and others with an opportunity to confront the offender, express their feelings, ask questions and have a say in the outcome.

Participation in conferences is voluntary. After it is determined that a conference is appropriate and offenders and victims have agreed to attend, the conference facilitator invites others affected by the incident — the family and friends of victims and offenders

A restorative conference can be used in lieu of traditional disciplinary or justice processes, or where that is not appropriate, as a supplement to those processes. In the Real Justice approach to restorative conferences, developed by Australian police officer Terry O’Connell, the conference facilitator sticks to a simple written script. The facilitator keeps the conference focused but is not an active participant. In the conference the facilitator provides an opportunity to each participant to speak, beginning with asking open-ended and affective restorative questions of the offender. The facilitator then asks victims and their family members and friends questions that provide an opportunity to tell about the incident from their perspective and how it affected them. The offenders’ family and friends are asked to do the same.

Peer to Peer Mediation

Peer-to-peer mediation is a form of conflict resolution in which trained student leaders help their peers work together to resolve everyday disputes using restorative practices models and processes.

Training Options

The Circle Process Training Seminar
1-Day Training (8-hour session, maximum of 20 participants per trainer)
$800.00 per trainer

The Circle Process Condensed Training Seminar
1-Day Training (12-hour session, maximum of 12 participants per trainer)
$300.00 per trainer

Restorative Justice IIRP Conferencing Seminar
2-Day Training (16 hours, maximum of 12 participants per session)
$1750.00 per trainer

The Circle Process Training the Trainer Seminar
2-Day Training (12 hours, maximum of 20 participants per session)
$1000.00 per trainer

Peer To Peer Mediation Training
2-Day Training (8 hours, maximum of 12 participants per trainer)
$1600.00 per trainer

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